Monday, 13 August 2012

Little History lesson on mascara !

The History of Mascara !!!!! 


Hey girls I thought this was cool I found this as a magazine article in a magazine while waiting for my friend and her daughter at the salon. I'm bringing you a great little history lesson on MASCARA a girls best friend in the make up world.  ( It's going to be long ) 


For many women their first introduction to the world of cosmetics was mascara. Many “moms” agree that mascara is an acceptable, age appropriate primping product and statistics don’t contradict this sentiment. According to Euromonitor International (a beauty and personal care research company), 61% of woman around the world own at least one tube of mascara. Mascara is such an integral part of our beauty routine. Over its more than 6,000 year long history, mascara has gone through some pretty big changes. For some fun (and surprising) facts about something you probably use every day, just keep reading.

 4000 BC -  Ancient Egyptians loved kohl liner and mascara. Eyes were believed to be the windows of the soul; they concealed them to ward off evil spirits. Since almost any ash can make a good pigment base, they used tons of different recipes, everything from burning almonds to using lead. Less modern, however, were the substances used to keep the color on their lashes such as honey and water mixed into a paste like substance.  



Egyptians used this slate palette to grind and mix kohl, water and fat to make pigments for eye paint. They applied their eye make-up using the copper probe shown below the palette.

100 BC - Ancient Romans (woman and men alike) idealize long, dark eyelashes as a sign of chastity. Kohl remained the main ingredient along with ash, soot, charred rose petals and date pits. Saffron was usually added to improve the smell. The kohl mixture was applied using a rounded stick, made of ivory, glass, bone, or wood, that would be dipped in either oil or water first, before being used to apply the kohl.


Shown here, Ancient Roman dipping cups for kohl mixture along with applicator sticks. 
Ancient Romans (woman and men alike) idealize long, dark eyelashes as a sign of chastity. Kohl remained the main ingredient along with ash, soot, charred rose petals and date pits. Saffron was usually added to improve the smell. The kohl mixture was applied using a rounded stick, made of ivory, glass, bone, or wood, that would be dipped in either oil or water first, before being used to apply the kohl.

900’s- Persian writer and man of fashion Ziryab opens a cosmetology school in what is now Spain. Here he teaches women how to formulate mascaras from soot and antimony, a toxic chemical element with the symbol Sb and an atomic number of 51. Antimony is ground down into a water soluble powder and used for its lustrous dark grey (almost black) metalloid color in mascaras.



1500’s- Despite the disapproval from the Church, sneaky Renaissance women, like famed beauty Simonetta Vespucci (as painted here by Botticelli), used makeup. The favoured mascara ingredient at this time was crushed walnut shells, which were applied to dye lashes darker.
Simonetta Vespucci (as painted here by Botticelli)



Dante Gabriel Rossetti (1828-1882) 
1850’s - During the Victorian era, social opinion shifted radically towards the promotion of cosmetics, and women were known to spend a majority of their day occupied with beauty regimens. Victorian women made a type of mascara in their own homes. They would heat a mixture of ash or lampblack (which is the sticky soot from oil lamps) and elderberry juice on a plate and apply the heated mixture to their eyelashes.



1917 - Eugene Rimmel (yes, that Rimmel), sells the first massmarket non-toxic mascara, which is made from petroleum jelly and coal dust. Unlike modern tube mascaras, the original Rimmel comes in a cake form. Pigmented powder was pressed to create compact cakes much like today’s blushes and foundations. The powder was then dissolved with a moist brush to help it cling to the lashes.


** Fun Fact:
Rimmel mascara became so popular that the word rimmel is still to this day the word for mascara in several languages.

1930s - Another early mascara was the cream type, which had the consistency of a lotion and came in small tubes. The mascara ingredients remained the same as the cake version, with the addition of natural waxes to get the required consistency. The cream was squeezed onto a small brush applicator, a process that proved too messy and led to the invention of the wand applicator. The 1930’s also saw the invention of waterproof mascara. First formulated from a blend of 50% turpentine, waterproof mascara, although novel and unique, caused many skin allergies. Besides the harsh chemical reaction of the waterproof formula, the putrid scent was most unbearable.


1960-Maybelline launches Magic Mascara, the first modern “automatic” (meaning that the brush comes in the tube and coats itself) mascara. It’s safe, gentle, and waterproof. The 60’s also saw the explosion of Twiggylike thick lashes everywhere.




DO!!

1988 - In the 80’s, excessive make-up was in fashion and lashes had to be equally as big and bold. Therefore mascara was a must-have, with colored formulas proving the most popular. While Princess Diana was the finest example of how to wear mascara during this period (she always wore blue), Tammy Faye Bakker best illustrated how not to wear it. In 1988, perhaps in reaction to the over use of mascara Max Factor launched the first ever clear mascara. Called No Color, it was the ideal product for women wishing to achieve a more natural look.
DON"T !!! 

2000’s - The last decade sees woman bombarded with mascara choices. Double ended mascaras, vibrating mascaras, and a whole host of new lengthening, volumizing, and thickening formulas. A new generation of geometrically shaped mascara wands is replacing rigid fiber brushes. Unevenly notched bristles, flexible plastic combs, rubbery prongs in bent and curved shapes are everywhere.



The Future-  Wands made from TPE (thermoplastic elastomer), brushless applicators, semipermanent, hypoallergenic, tubes or tottles? These are the questions facing the industry and the evolution of mascara. In 2010 close to 120 mascara products were launched in Canada; in the United States, it was 349. With these numbers you don’t have to be an expert in the field to know that mascaras are not going to become a thing of the past.

1 comment:

  1. This is Sooo interesting! I never thought it was that complicated, but how awesome :D

    Http://indefinitestyle.blogspot.com/

    ReplyDelete